Inside of the box

Student experiment “PAPELL” features Bartels mp6 micro pump

A group of students at the University of Stuttgart has developed the “pump of the future” by picking up rather old ideas and combining them with modern methods.

The idea originates from a theory NASA engineer Steve Papell had in 1963. Pappel wanted to replace conventional rocket engines by transporting ferromagnetic fuel with a pump, hence the “pump of the future” comes into play today.

To transport a ferromagnetic fuel, you need a suitable unit. Without mechanical parts, Bartels mp6 has significant advantages towards common rocket engines. A few of those being:

  • Less wear, therefore the Bartels mp6 is maintenance-friendly
  • Low noise level
  • High durability
  • Long term running with low maintenance costs
  • Reduced technical disturbances
  • Minimal vibrations interfere with high sensitivity parts
360° shot of the box, mp6 micro pump the red part

Development is easy, fast and convenient because usually necessary mechanical lifetime tests cease.

At the beginning of 2018 a 10x10x15 cm (3.94×3.94×5.91 in) box with a build-in Bartels mp6 will launch into space to mke its way to te ISS. The Bartels mp6 will promote a ferrofluidic liquid to prove two theories.

  1. Individual drops liquid can be moved, divided and fused again by means of electromagnets under circumstances of zero gravity
  2. They can also be moved in a pipe system – later in the experiment solid objects shall be moved and sorted by color as well

All data will be stored inside the box and evaluated after the mission is complete. Bartels Mikrotechnik will keep you updated on the project and the results. For further information visit www.ksat-stuttgart.de.


Micro technology in outer space

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